No room for corruption

Our country has huge and sometimes seemingly daunting problems, one of which is widespread corruption.

Our country has huge and sometimes seemingly daunting problems, one of which is widespread corruption.

The greasing of palms is so endemic to the private sector that it has become acceptable as the natural order of things. Some companies even budget for it, hiding it in innocuous entries in their books.

Our government, for all its spectacular failings, should be commended for making the fight against corruption a priority. Sadly, though, the menace remains rife.

Far too many politicians and bureaucrats have been found with their hands in the proverbial cookie jar. Public tender processes are awash with favouritism. One does not need to search too hard to find someone ready to admit to having paid a high-ranking or lowly public official for the favour of doing business with a state entity.

The beauty, though, is that our nation refuses to accept corruption as the norm.

A good example is the scrapping of Chippy Shaik's bogus doctorate in mechanical engineering by the University of Kwazulu-Natal.

The move is an instance of academinc freedom, as enshrined in our Constitution, being exercised.

Now Shaik and his ilk know that certain things, such as university degrees, are indeed sacrosanct.

Of course, it would not have been possible but for good exposé journalism that knows neither fear no favour.

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