Old attitudes still prevail

As in Kempton Park where the deal for the new South Africa was hammered out, blacks again showed their willingness to embrace white South Africa.

As in Kempton Park where the deal for the new South Africa was hammered out, blacks again showed their willingness to embrace white South Africa.

The euphoria in the townships following the Springboks Rugby World Cup triumph typified this spirit.

It was nine days ago when the almost all-white South African team demolished England 15-6 in France. Today, talk of that victory still elicits celebratory moods in every black household.

But that is not what black South Africa is getting from rugby administrators. Otherwise, Soweto, the country's biggest township and most famous internationally, would have been top of the Boks' victory parade itinerary.

Not so. It was only after a hue and cry that administrators put Soweto in their programme. It was an afterthought.

Small wonder that amid the euphoria, some sections of the black community still think rugby is a white sport and administrators will not voluntarily try to unearth a Percy Montgomery from the townships.

It is a pattern in this country. Large sections of the community still resist change. They cling to the fruits of apartheid and view change as a threat to their privileged status.

Like the Boks tickertape tour to Soweto, they embrace black only to salve their conscience. And unless there is an attitudinal change, the South Africa of them and us will never be contained.

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