Sack McBride if he is guilty

I follow the McBride saga with interest, not because I care much about Robert McBride, but because this matter touches on a broader problem that we have with public officials, and its resolution may influence the way officials conduct themselves in the future.

I follow the McBride saga with interest, not because I care much about Robert McBride, but because this matter touches on a broader problem that we have with public officials, and its resolution may influence the way officials conduct themselves in the future.

On the merits, it is important for us all to bear in mind that we do not really have all the facts. Until a fair legal process has examined the evidence we should exercise restraint in passing judgment. However, we are certainly entitled to question what is appropriate behaviour by a public official, as well as possible abuse of power. Such questions should not be discouraged in a democratic state.

I would urge people to understand the critical importance of separating past struggle credentials from current business credentials.

It may help a person who participated in the struggle to gain a position, but by no means should it serve to keep them there.

Once I give someone a job, I would expect them to perform according to the requirements of the post. In the case of a senior police official, performance goes even beyond crime management - it must include adherence to high ethical standards that the community can justifiably respect.

When such a figure is exposed in a manner unbefitting of such office, that official should be removed pending investigation, and if found guilty, they must be fired.

Bryan Arumugam, Johannesburg

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