SAPS pull out all stops

It is indisputable that manpower has not been the strongest feature of the SAPS in its efforts to be one step ahead of criminals.

It is indisputable that manpower has not been the strongest feature of the SAPS in its efforts to be one step ahead of criminals.

Even efforts to beef up the country's police force to 150000 offered little comfort to a crime-weary public, which has suggested the army be roped in to lend a helping hand.

So Safety and Security Minister Charles Nqakula's decision to incorporate volunteers and reservists to strengthen the SAPS's hand in their fight against crime should evoke a sense of public euphoria.

Speaking in Pietermaritzburg at the weekend, Nqakula said they needed at least 100000 reservists who will obviously be deployed in areas heavily plagued by crime.

The minister's announcement is welcome and has shown the government's intention to tackle the scourge - once and for all.

Statistics have overwhelmingly shown that crime is still one of South Africa's biggest challenges today.

The proposed reinforcement of the force should be accompanied by high police visibility on the streets - a definite deterrent in the fight against crime. The objective is to launch a pre-emptive strike against criminals who will be discouraged by an overtly visible police presence.

The process to recruit the reservists must begin promptly.

X