Get real, Safpu

Early last year, the South African Football Players Union came out guns blazing that the players were abused in that they did not benefit from the broadcast rights.

Early last year, the South African Football Players Union came out guns blazing that the players were abused in that they did not benefit from the broadcast rights.

Safpu were talking millions of rands, saying they would fight to the bitter end to ensure that the players also get a slice from the cake.

On Thursday, SAfm ran a news item that Safpu supported the SABC in trying to block the PSL from awarding the broadcast rights to SuperSport International.

Later that evening, I saw Safpu's Sipho Ndzudzo, musicians such as Mzwakhe Mbuli and Sello Twala seating next to the good advocate, SABC CEO Dali Mpofu.

There were other structures present.

It is clear that somebody has been trying hard to mobilise support to mislead the South African public that they won't be able to watch professional soccer on television.

My interest here is on Safpu, an organisation that is supposed to be fighting for the rights of the professional and semi-professional players. When the PSL signed the landmark deal with the pay television channel two weeks ago, it was announced that the clubs would benefit a great deal.

It is against this background that I find it strange that Safpu are not happy with the move by the PSL to seek a better deal that will also see the salaries of players improved.

I honestly believe Sapfu were at a wrong boardroom that day; they should have been at the PSL's to find out what was there for their members. They needed to do that and also start organising workshops to educate players on how to invest their money rather than buy a fleet of luxury cars.

As for the musicians such as Comrade Mzwakhe, I wonder what the heck they were doing there, unless it was another way of apologising to the to the SABC for their "bribe claims".

Two weeks ago musicians were moaning that they had to pay bribes for their songs to be played at some of the SABC radio stations.

Lastly, the SABC board must investigate the dismissal of Robert Marawa from MetroFM. His was a simple journalistic ethic that you must get both sides of the story.

There is no doubt Marawa was fired for inviting SuperSport CEO Imtiaz Patel (who also revealed that SABC's rivals e.tv was to partner them) to get their side of the story on this contentious issue.

Patel clearly antagonised the SABC in the manner in which he explained the matter to the public, saying that cup finals and Soweto derbies will still be shown on SABC, if the latter were interested.

We just hope sanity will eventually prevail.

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