Employing former inmates will cut crime

It is widely accepted that unemployment is one of the main contributors of crime in this country. We also know that employment is the responsibility of people who are in charge of society.

It is widely accepted that unemployment is one of the main contributors of crime in this country. We also know that employment is the responsibility of people who are in charge of society.

An approach that deals with the needs and problems of society, but which excludes inmates and ex-offenders is unwise. Organs of state should not be found wanting in this regard.

The public sector must be at the forefront in ensuring that the rehabilitation and effective reintegration of inmates into society is a success lest unemployment leads these people back into jail.

The public sector should also meaningfully contribute to employment opportunities for former inmates.

The notion that a person with a prison record, irrespective of the crime committed, should not be employed does nothing to help this process.

The private sector should also be receptive to former offenders - as long as they have been rehabilitated, are skilled and pose no threat to society.

The public and private sectors should contribute to sustainable job-creation projects for ex-offenders just as they do for people who have never been imprisoned.

They should also employ former offenders because this will reassure society that the person poses no more danger than someone who has never been to prison.

Golden Miles Bhudu,

President of SAPOHR

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