Media ignores environment

Environmental issues are neglected by the black media, as if black people don't care about the environment. You can count the number of times articles on global warming or talk shows debating the implications of climate change.

Environmental issues are neglected by the black media, as if black people don't care about the environment. You can count the number of times articles on global warming or talk shows debating the implications of climate change.

Black politicians seem reluctant to talk about it to black people. But global warming is not only a problem of Sandton residents, but Alexandra too.

Films such as The Day After Tomorrow, that depicts the dangers of climate change, are not accessible to everyone. And Internet is too expensive for most people. This makes global warming an abstract term, with no meaning for the majority of our people.

Information about environmental studies must be made available to empower people because global warming is a threat to mankind, not just the West. It is very relevant in Africa, where 85percent of people depend on agriculture.

Kenya's Nobel prize winner, Professor Wangari Maathai, has shown a link between poverty and environmental degradation. That is why the issue should be a priority in Africa.

It is demeaning to assume black people don't care about the environment and that our lives are consumed by cars, shopping, unemployment and soccer. Environmental issues should become a regular feature of our media.

Lucas Ntyintyane, Johannesburg

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