Buyer becomes embroiled in divorce tussle

When the divorce court ordered that Victor Nkomo was entitled to half of the common estate he had amassed with his ex-wife, he thought his troubles were over.

When the divorce court ordered that Victor Nkomo was entitled to half of the common estate he had amassed with his ex-wife, he thought his troubles were over.

The couple agreed they would sell their house and split the proceeds equitably.

Their house has been on auction twice and each time a buyer was found, his ex-wife has tried to buy Nkomo out. Nkomo would not sell.

His ex-wife managed to find a buyer on her own and sold the house for R310000, he said.

When Nkomo approached Rooth & Wessels Attorneys to claim his half, he was told the sale of the house did not go through and there was no share to distribute, he said.

The buyer, Priscilla Mashamaite, said she had paid R317000 into the trust account of Rooth & Wessels Atttorneys in January.

The money paid included the necessary registration fees.

Mashamaite said she also felt she was being entangled in Nkomo's problems.

She claims the attorneys have now asked her to give Nkomo's ex-wife a chance to raise the funds and buy Nkomo out.

"This is ridiculous.

"If Nkomo's ex-wife could not buy him out for the past three years, why do the attorneys want me to give him another chance after accepting my money?" said Mashamaite, who had used a large portion of her retirement payout to buy the house.

She said when she retired from nursing last year, she decided to move from Polokwane to Soshanguve.

Since her return, she had been renting a back room, she said.

Mellisa Shaw of Rooth & Wessels said she needed to investigate the matter.

She said she would discuss it with her conveyancer who would only be back in the office today.

"You can expect a response towards the end of the week," said Shaw.

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