Fakes brand false economies

Counterfeit trade remains a rogue feature of economies across the world in spite of intensified campaigns by governments to stamp it out.

Counterfeit trade remains a rogue feature of economies across the world in spite of intensified campaigns by governments to stamp it out.

Ironically fake goods generate more cash than legitimate businesses today, raking in millions of rands for illegal traders daily.

As one policeman put it, fake goods make quick profits for criminals but end up causing damage to legitimate businesses and potential harm to customers who think they're getting a bargain.

This week local police, accompanied by top musicians, arrested a man during a swoop on a Johannesburg house, where they found R7million worth of recording equipment, fake CDs and DVDs, including a bunker used as a hideout.

Sadly police throughout the world seem to be fighting a losing battle against the elusive counterfeit gangs who, once detected, invariably move business to another location without much hassle.

Notably international businesses are taking the threat of counterfeit products to their survival seriously. The trend is to employ full-time company task teams to track down traders who peddle fake goods.

To be a step ahead of the illegal traders, it is imperative that all stakeholders - including government, police and business - establish a coherent response to the scourge.

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