Umpires wired to catch edges

KINGSTON - The Super Eight match between Australia and the West Indies that ended in Antigua on Tuesday was the first of the World Cup to use stump microphone technology in a move designed to make sure that even more decisions made by umpires are correct.

KINGSTON - The Super Eight match between Australia and the West Indies that ended in Antigua on Tuesday was the first of the World Cup to use stump microphone technology in a move designed to make sure that even more decisions made by umpires are correct.

From now on in this tournament, on-field umpires are wearing earpieces giving them an audio connection with the stump microphones, allowing them to hear faint edges and thus giving them a better chance of making the correct caught behind or lbw decision.

International Cricket Council general manager David Richardson explained the decision to make the most of this technology.

"The use of this technology should ensure that that our top umpires get even more decisions correct," said Richardson.

"Television viewers or people listening to radio can hear fine edges through the stump microphones, something umpires have not always had the benefit of in the past.

"In many instances, if it is particularly windy or in noisy grounds, it can be extremely difficult to hear faint edges from 22 yards away. By linking to the stump microphones umpires now have that luxury and this should ensure even more correct decisions." - Sapa

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