Remove offenders, not cars

I fully agree with Dan Nkosi's letter "Impounding is not the solution" on December 5 because it defeats the objective.

I fully agree with Dan Nkosi's letter "Impounding is not the solution" on December 5 because it defeats the objective.

It must be unconstitutional to impound vehicles from perpetrators who are not necessarily legal owners. The legal owners cannot be victims of impoundment as a result of the conduct of drivers who borrowed, leased or hired vehicles from them. This is not only legally problematic, but ambiguous in its execution.

It is not clear how the metro police will impound state vehicles if the perpetrators are public servants. It is obvious the victims of impoundment would be companies, taxi owners and people with vehicles on credit agreement because ownership passes to the buyer only when the vehicle is fully paid for.

The nature of a credit agreement entered into is binding and enforceable in court without any legislative interference. So impounding vehicles on credit agreement may be illegal.

Ideally, the law must take its course against reckless drivers without violating the rights of others or interfering with credit agreements.

The metro police can confiscate the licences of dangerous and reckless drivers. Let the courts suspend or revoke such licences, or even remove offenders permanently from our roads.

Morgan Phaahla, Ekurhuleni

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