Prostate cancer clipped

HONG KONG - Scientists in Hong Kong have identified a protein that can help suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells, the third most common cancer in men worldwide.

HONG KONG - Scientists in Hong Kong have identified a protein that can help suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells, the third most common cancer in men worldwide.

With 500000 new cases a year, prostate cancer afflicts one in every six men in the US and one in 50 men in Hong Kong.

But current therapies for advanced prostate cancer, such as chemotherapy, are far from satisfactory and carry side effects.

In a study first published on-line in the July issue of Endocrinology, researchers at the University of Hong Kong found that human prostate cancer cells produce a protein called sPDZD2.

Researchers found that when the protein was blocked in laboratory mice, prostate cancer cells in the rodents grew more quickly, and vice versa.

The results of the research will appear in the printed version of the journal next month.

The finding might pave the way for the making of a new drug, but that is not expected soon.

It is the guardian angel and it can slow down the cancer cell cycle progression, said Yao Kwok-ming, assistant professor. - Reuters

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