22 degrees is the ticket to happiness

You are at your friendliest and happiest when the temperature is 22 degrees Celsius study suggests.
You are at your friendliest and happiest when the temperature is 22 degrees Celsius study suggests.
Image: STOCK IMAGE/PIXABAY

You are at your friendliest and happiest when the temperature is 22 degrees Celsius.

Researchers at Beijing's Peking University believe that personalities may be shaped by the climate. Analysing data from more than 1.6-million people in China and the United States‚ the researchers discovered that 22 degrees was the best temperature for happiness.

Despite differences in gender‚ age‚ average income and culture in these two countries‚ wherever the temperature is 22 degrees‚ people are generally “more agreeable‚ conscientious‚ emotionally stable‚ extroverted and open to new experiences”‚ the study found.

“Our findings offer insights into why people in different regions of the world exhibit different personality traits and behaviours. As climate change continues across the world‚ we may also observe concomitant changes in human personality‚” the researchers said in their paper‚ published in the Nature Human Behaviour journal this week.

Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital principal psychologist Jasmin Kooverjee could not comment on the reliability or validity of the study‚ but said that people are more relaxed when they are comfortable.

“An average temperature of 22 [degrees] means it is comfortable. It is not too hot or cold. When people are comfortable‚ they are actually friendly‚ because they are more relaxed – versus someone in a very hot temperature; they are hot and bothered‚ restless and tired. In the same way‚ people who don’t manage cold easily will not be comfortable.”

“I don’t think the temperature equates to a friendlier person. It equates to being more comfortable‚ and the secondary consequences of that are that you are a much more relaxed person. Therefore‚ you are friendlier and smiling‚” she explained.

 

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