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Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Des Van Rooyen. Picture Credit: Gallo Images
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'Recession keeps my nyatsi away'

By Zenoyise Madikwa | Jun 29, 2009 | COMMENTS [ 0 ]

THE biting recession and credit crisis have had a negative impact on many extramarital affairs.

THE biting recession and credit crisis have had a negative impact on many extramarital affairs.

According to Prince Tshabalala, presenter of the popular Cheaters Uyajola show aired every Thursday evening on Jozi FM, infidelity rates have dropped since the beginning of the financial crisis.

Tshabalala says many men are doing away with extra-marital relationships because they cannot afford hanky-panky anymore.

He says many cheat - especially sugar daddies who hold high positions in companies - have been badly affected and no longer have money and the credit cards required to maintain an extramarital relationship.

Tshabalala says some guys who have been laid off do not reveal their unemployed status to a potential date because they fear rejection.

Many potential conquests and dates run away as soon as they find out that a guy does not have a job, he says.

"Some men who have called in say they feel the economic pressure because they are generally expected to pay for a date and maintain women. They say they can barely afford to pay their own bills, so they cannot afford gifts, dining out or sleeping in hotels.

Tshabalala adds that the tables have been turned because women now cheat more than men.

Women say love alone is no longer enough. They need men to pay their bills. They are looking for extramarital relationships to boost their finances. Many want someone who can afford to maintain them and their children.

Lethu Majola, a divorce attorney, says recession has saved many marriages.

"Spouses who catch their partners cheating would rather sort out the problem through family intervention than undertake expensive divorce proceedings.

"This has had a negative impact on our business. People fear losing their cars and houses because they are uncertain about the future," Majola said.

Luzuko Mabandla, a family psychologist, says cheating men no longer womanise. Instead they have found new interests such as sport.

"This has brought stability to families because men now spend quality time with their children and wives. Men who used to spend time in the arms of other women are now back in their wives' beds," Mabandla says.

He says old habits die hard though. He predicts that as soon as the economic situation improves, cheats will go back to their old ways.


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