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A gripping story of espionage

By unknown | Aug 21, 2007 | COMMENTS [ 0 ]

Book: Glass Tiger

Book: Glass Tiger

Author: Joe Gores

Publisher: Quercus

Reviewer: Nthabisang Moreosele

The author received praise for this book from reviewers in his country. They were all couched in superlatives.

It is easy to see why. The book is an action-packed thriller from the first page to the last. The reader can actually see the story unfolding before her eyes.

Gores is a screenwriter for television and film. His narrative style suggests that while writing it he had one eye on its adaptation for the screen.

The story begins with Brendan Thorne living it up on a game reserve in Kenya. He is a has-been CIA assassin haunted by nightmares of his past career.

His former bosses frame him into going after a man who has threatened to kill the new US president. Thorne then begins tracking this man through the wilderness and eventually finds him.

Inexplicably, he lets him go. The CIA then tries to have him shipped back to Africa for poaching, but he eludes them and begins hunting his adversary all over again.

The second part of the book has some storyline and the unfolding reasons behind the attempt on the president's life. It is surprising that the reasons are only advanced when the book reaches a hiatus too soon.

It is as though the author was told to stretch the book a bit, that it was too short.

Gores is a good writer and storyteller, notwithstanding a few gripes about his plot. He provides a sleek and galloping pace that keeps you glued to the pages even if the emotional content is a bit simplistic.

He delivers a neat twist to the ending that is morally acceptable, but has a naively irritating solution.


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