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30 second date rape drug test

By Aggregated content | 2014-03-28 09:24:54.0

The flourescent sensor can change the colour of drinks within second to warn people drugs have been added.

Chemists in Singapore have unveiled a groundbreaking new instant test for the most popular date rape drug.

The flourescent sensor can change the colour of drinks within second to warn people drugs have been added.

It can detect Gamma-Hydroxybutyric (GHB), or 'liquid ecstasy', which can can make anyone fall into a deep sleep.

Current tests for GHB are difficult to carry out, the researchers say.

Professor Chang Young-Tae, from the Department of Chemistry at National University of Singapore, said: 'The current method in the market is using (a) kind of paper (a tissue-like piece of paper) and... run the paper chromatography separations.

'The problem is, to run those samples -- the paper chromatography -- it takes about 10 minutes of your time.'

'Currently, we are using the test tube kind of approach… but who would want to bring this (a test tube) to the discotheque?"'

Scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have now found a way for GHB to show itself instantaneously - by changing the colour of the drink.

When the sensor is mixed with a sample of a beverage containing GHB, the mixture changes colour in less than 30 seconds, making detection of the drug fast and easy.

The team shortlisted 17 fluorescent compounds and further tested them with a wide range of different GHB concentrations.

Through this, the team identified that an orange fluorescent compound, coined GHB Orange, changes colour when it is mixed with GHB.  www.dailymail.co.uk

Symptoms of being drugged could include some of the following:

loss of balance and finding it hard to move

temporary loss of body sensation

temporary amnesia (memory loss)

waking up feeling confused or disorientated, with memory blanks about the night before

difficulty speaking, or slurring your words

light headedness or drowsiness

difficulty focusing/blurred vision

difficulty concentrating

nausea and vomiting

feelings of paranoia, fear or distrust of others

feeling sleepy, dizzy or faint

falling unconscious.

Advice to avoid drink spiking:

Do not leave your drink unattended at any time, even while you are in the toilet.

If for any reason your drink has been left unattended and when you return it has been moved, looks different, appears to have been topped-up, or tastes strange, don't drink it.

Avoid going to pubs, clubs, parties alone: Friends can look out for each other.

Keep your drink in your hand, and hold your thumb over the opening if you are drinking from a bottle.

Watch your drinks being poured.

Don’t take drinks from large open containers such as punch bowls.

Don't drink too much. Remember, alcohol affects your awareness of danger and dulls your instincts, making you more vulnerable.

Have an awareness of your own alcohol tolerance. Do you feel strange or drunk after one or two drinks when you’d normally feel fine? If so let someone you trust know.

Never accept a drink from anyone you do not know or trust.

Do not share or exchange drinks, or drink leftover drinks.

Whenever possible, drink from a bottle rather than a glass. Drinks in bottles are harder to spike.

Think carefully before leaving the pub or club with someone you have only just met.

Plan your journey; know how you are getting home.

Ensure someone knows where you are and when you are expected home.

Remain aware of what is going on around you and stay away from situations you do not feel comfortable with.

Remember drugs can be put in soft drinks, tea, coffee, hot chocolate etc, as well as alcohol.

If you go on a date, tell a friend or relative where you will be and what time you will be back.

Do not give private information, such as your address; to anyone you have just met.

What to do if you think you’ve been drugged?

If you are with a friend you trust ask them to help you home. Be careful who you trust - statistics suggest that many victims know their attacker.

If you’re in need of urgent assistance call 999.

If you are alone or with a stranger, go to the venue manager or security and ask them to ring your parents, a friend or, if necessary, contact emergency services. It is important to report the incident as quickly as possible to the police. Drugs can leave the body very quickly, making them harder to detect. The sooner you are tested, the more chance you have of it still being in your system.

Do not accept help from a stranger - they could be responsible for spiking your drink. onlinenews.warwickshire.police.uk

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SOURCES: www.dailymail.co.uk, www.medicinenet.com and onlinenews.warwickshire.police.uk

 

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