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Record label Kalawa Jazmee musicians and staff paid a visit to the Doug Whitehead School in honour o.

Acclaimed artists set for Soweto gig

By Edward Tsumele | Nov 24, 2010 | COMMENTS [ 2 ]

A COLLECTIVE of artists who have appeared in some of the most memorable musicals have now come together to form their own identity and are fast making a name for themselves.

The ensemble, called the Junior Manhattan Brothers, comprises former members of the Soweto Gospel Choir and Ipi 'Ntombi musical shows that travelled the world.

Thabo Motsamai appeared in Iphi 'Ntombi, Sikhuli and Umoja, while the young and vibrant Nathi Radebe sang with the Soweto Gospel Choir and Tshepo Tshola. He also appeared in a film, The Drum, just to name a few out of this ensemble.

OnSunday the group will perform at Leshala Cuisine, 139 Makapane Street, Molapo, Soweto, at a function organised by a Soweto-based networking club.

The ensemble will share the stage with DJ Ziduma-Mo, who will be doing what he does best - taking music fans back to sikiza, bump jive and get downs music of yesteryear.

The spotlight, however, will be on the Junior Manhattan Brothers, who will invigorate the session with their tenor and bass voices.

COMMENTS [ 2 ]

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Ok ..i wonder.

Nov 24, 2010 4:6 | 0 replies

South Africa, please get behind your artists, rather than make overpaid, less talented overseas artists even richer. I am the mother in law of one of the Junior Manhattan Brothers. He was one of the most proud South Africans you could meet and he spent his entire life fighting for the rights of his people. And he was also one of the most talented. We lost him this year from a basic cause - contaminated water!
Nathi died homeless and destitute - after entertaining South Africa and then the world for what seemed like his entire life. He beat poverty and cared for his family from a young age.
He shared the stage with the greats and was so well respected around the world by his peers. Another member of the JMB is struggling as much as Nathi was before he passed. Nathi and my daughter fought with every cell of their bodies to survive and brought hope to many, as an interracial couple - they shared their love of music, gospel, art, dance, travel, philanthropy, martial arts, language and children. Nathi beat the odds when he survived and recovered from advanced TB - he was given the all clear and was finally free to be with his wife in Australia - yet management would not allow the release of his travel papers, nor would they pay him for work. While conventional medicine had no hope for him, his wife administered traditional medicines, homoeopathy, acupuncture, supplements and herbs.
The cause of this struggle? The management of the SGChoir are in it for one reason - money. Nathi fought for the rights of the choir - and just like so many other members who fought for their pay (they do not get royalties and can go for a long time without an income, even though they are worked to death), he was sacked. No income, his wife was sent back to Australia, his life insurance was cancelled and some of those who he had supported during his life turned their backs on him, as a burden. Those who loved him were unable to help in the end.
At his memorial, his manager was guilted into caring for the remaining members as too many have died poor and destitute while millions of rand are squirreled away. Nathi fought hard and it cost his life. My daughter is a widow at 22 - after a never ending struggle. His beautiful face and voice still sells albums around the world. Nothing will bring our angel back but unless South Africa gets behind its artists, this will happen again. In his final days, he was ensuring that his proteges were set up and able to work - before he joined his wife in Australia again, he wanted to ensure the survival of his loved ones.
South Africa lost a great gospel and jazz legend in April 2011 - please don't let his death be in vain.

Aug 26, 2011 6:4 | 0 replies